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Catherine Carry

"Qanuqtuurniq - Finding the Balance" TV Series - Episode 1 - "How are we as men?"

Inuit men have experienced many changes to their way of life in just two generations. This has sometimes left Inuit men feeling lost and unsure of their place in the family and community. Their level of distress can be seen in the low school completion rates and high levels of incarceration and suicide. Men need a voice.

Programs and services for men – many created and led by men – are giving them an opportunity to seek help, better understand their needs and strengths, and revive their traditions and culture. “Angutiilli qanuiliqpat? – How are we as men?,” is the first of a three-part live, public TV series, “Qanuqtuurniq – Finding the Balance,” on Inuit health and wellness issues and solutions. In this episode (now an on-line video product) viewers will see live discussions, information from the International Polar Year's Inuit Health Survey, and stories of community programs that are helping Inuit men to improve their physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health.

Led by Inuit Tuttarvingat of the National Aboriginal Health Organization in Canada, it was broadcast in May 2009 on the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network – North and in Alaska on 360North. The series was a communications and outreach project for International Polar Year aired in the Inuit language (with English captions/sub-titles) and simultaneously webcast. The goal of each episode was to engage the Inuit public (the primary audience), and others in ‘real time’ dialogue about health and wellness issues and health research, and to deliver key messages.


Type of Product:   Video

Year Created: 2010
Date Published: 6/28/2012


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Melany Cueva

“What’s the Big Deal?” Readers’ Theatre to Inform, Inspire, and Ignite Action

‘What’s the Big Deal?’ a 25-minute Readers’ Theatre script was developed with and for Alaska Native and American Indian Community Health Workers and the people in their communities to provide colorectal cancer screening information, increase comfort with talking about colorectal cancer screening, and encourage people to have recommended colorectal cancer screenings. Stories from colorectal cancer survivors, their families and care givers, medical providers, and Community Health Workers were woven into the lives of six characters who use humor and story to talk about common questions, concerns, and feelings related to colorectal cancer screening. The characters include Isaac, a man in his early 50s whose father died of colorectal cancer, his wife, Beverly who has recently turned 50 and has no family history of colorectal cancer and their two children, Rita and Freddie. Additionally, the script includes Isaac’s brother, Uncle Ward and the doctor who does the colonoscopy procedures. Readers’ Theatre is the coming together of a group of people to read aloud a written conversation. “What’s the Big Deal?” can be read as part of cancer education, school presentations, community gatherings, dinner theatre, or a radio show. Community Health Workers, community members, cancer survivors, and people of all ages interested in learning more about colorectal screening are possible participants. People of all ages can support recommended colorectal screening exams. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends men and women ages 50 to 75 have colorectal screening.


Type of Product:   MS Word document

Year Created: 2010
Date Published: 12/6/2011


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Karen Love

A Manual for Community Based Participatory Research: Using Research to Improve Practice and Inform Policy in Assisted Living

The Center for Excellence in Assisted Living (CEAL) and researchers at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) partnered to create a first-of-its-kind instructional manual designed to promote and guide the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) in aging and long-term care research. This manual was informed by a two-year research grant funded by the U.S. Agency for Health Care Research and Quality that was aimed at better understanding medication management practices in long-term care. The research project employed CBPR methodology to involve the many and varied constituencies essential in designing, conducting, disseminating, and translating long-term care research. Throughout the project, the CBPR team – comprised of long-term care researchers, consumers, advocacy groups, policy-makers, practitioners, and corporate representatives – worked together to identify and create effective and efficient CBPR structures and processes. This manual details the CBPR principles and processes, and also offers specific examples of, and recommendations for, practically implementing CBPR in the field of long-term care. The manual provides examples from the medication management research project throughout, in an easily understandable format.

This manual was designed to be used by all researchers and community members, but is especially aimed towards stakeholders in the long-term care community.


Type of Product:   PDF document

Year Created: 2009
Date Published: 10/23/2009


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Kelly Washburn, MPH

A Toolkit for Building Primary Care Research in Community Health Centers

Primary care providers, staff, and administrators in community health centers (CHC) have the opportunity to develop research questions relevant to the populations they serve as well as to translate evidence into practice in order to improve the health of their communities. Often, they lack the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively engage in research in their health centers. Available free of charge on the internet, this toolkit contains audio-recorded modules with accompanying PDFs to provide CHC providers and staff with the basic foundation of knowledge, skills, and tools to engage in research. Accompanying the toolkit are three worksheets designed to assist the CHCs as they navigate developing grants, collaborating with external researchers, and utilizing their electronic health record system for research. The toolkit is intended for providers, staff, and administrators at CHCs who are initiating research and/or collaborating with external researchers.


Type of Product:   Website

Year Created: 2011
Date Published: 8/29/2013


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Simon Laprise

Apollo: A new model of rehabilitation services

Many health care settings around the world are struggling to increase the quality of services they offer to children with disabilities. The product is a video sharing the story of the Children’s and Teenagers’ Program (CTP) that undertook the challenge to reorganize its services to increase service accessibility. A participatory action research (PAR) project documented the 3-year process and evaluated the outcomes following the implementation of the new model of service delivery. Two versions of the video are presented. The shorter version (7m25s, Apollo_short_version) specifically targets children with disabilities, their families and community partners (e.g. School Boards). This video is a tool to share information with them regarding the model of service delivery at the CTP, fostering their empowerment in the rehabilitation process. The longer version of the video (two parts named Apollo Long Version PT1 & PT2, 7m55s & 8m18s) targets health care sector workers & groups of individuals interested in reorganizing rehabilitation services. It provides more information on the facilitators, the barriers and the outcomes related to such a service reorganization, providing tips for future projects. Both versions of the video aim at sharing information to support quality improvement efforts. They can be viewed alone, in a self-standing format, or can be used as a tool during meetings with partners to foster discussions on how to improve service quality in a particular program.


Type of Product:   Video

Year Created: 2011
Date Published: 4/9/2012


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Paul Lachapelle

Apsaalooke Upsauloouk Bucha Unnaylayda - Crow Men's Health

Apsaalooke Upsauloouk Bucha Unnaylayda - Crow Men's Health, is an educational film that presents narratives by Crow men directed toward raising awareness of men’s health and preventative treatment options and increasing the participation of adult Native American men in preventative health screenings. Whether they talk about it or not, health is a very important part of all Crow men’s lives. A modern lifestyle of fast-food, sedentary lifestyles, and a general lack of interest in traditional cultural knowledge and practice have jeopardized the overall health of Native American men. In this video, Crow men discuss their feelings about the barriers to health, wellness and health prevention, and the Crow Men’s Health Ride. Footage of the 2008 ride to the Four Dances Vision Site acknowledging the importance of health and recognizing the young Crow men who sacrificed their lives in the eighteenth century by riding their horses over a cliff in order to save the Tribe from smallpox is included. This film is intended to be used as a resource for Crow men and all Native American men for education and inspiration about men’s health. The target audience is Crow men, all enrolled Crow members, Native American men across Montana and the United States, and health professionals involved in Native American health issues.


Type of Product:   DVD

Year Created: 2009
Date Published: 11/1/2012


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Melany Cueva

Awakening Choices: Colon Health, Our Stories

‘Awakening Choices: Colon Health, Our Stories’ is a 28-minute movie available on DVD that shares the stories of Alaska Native men and women talking about recommended colorectal cancer screening exams and wellness ways to decrease cancer risk. Yupik dolls, symbols of the old ones, guide our artistic movie journey showing us ways to keep our bodies strong and our communities healthy. Viewers can experience stories of wellness; celebrate the gift of life through the beauty of Alaska Native people’s songs, dances, and culture. We learn the importance of colorectal screening through the stories of Alaska Native people. “Inspired, motivated, comfortable, relieved, encouraged, hopeful”, words expressed in response to watching the movie. Other Alaskan viewer comments: “I felt a part of the people in the movie-same fears, same relief;” “I want to go and get colon screening now.” The movie is recommended for viewers of all ages to support community wellness. Men and women age 50 and older are especially encouraged to learn more about recommended screening exams to prevent colorectal cancer or to find colorectal cancer early when it can be best treated.
The DVD also includes a 5-minute preview of the movie and a 30-second public service announcement designed for television use.
A booklet and a 24-page activity guide with four interactive activities accompany the movie to support continued learning and community cancer education.


Type of Product:   Video

Year Created: 2009
Date Published: 11/1/2011


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Howard Taras

Basic research concepts explained in short video clips

This series of short animated videos explains a number of key research concepts in ways that are quick, interesting, and accessible to the general public. Videos use animation and photos to simplify and enhance the content and are intended to promote understanding of and engagement in the scientific research process. They are designed for individuals who are contemplating participation in a clinical research study, especially those who need to build the research literacy necessary to give informed consent. The concepts explained in these videos establish a foundation that can be built upon to explain more complex procedures in a specific research study. Videos are appropriate for individuals who are interested in research but are unfamiliar with core concepts and are available in both English and Spanish language versions.

There are five topics in the series:
“What is a Control Group?” Length: 2 min 7 sec
“What is Random Assignment?” Length: 3 min 1 sec
“Who can participate in research?” Length 1 min 52 sec
“How is research made safe?” Length 2 min 35 sec
“ResearchMatch: Be informed about Studies” Length 2 min 45 sec

These videos were developed to augment existing resources in other media. Written information to explain these concepts is located on the NIH web site “NIH Clinical Research Trials and You.” Researchers and educators are encouraged to make use of existing materials and to include information regarding local resources. Information about how to register for ResearchMatch is available on the ResearchMatch.org web site.


Type of Product:   Video

Year Created: 2012
Date Published: 11/21/2013


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Jean McClelland

Battered Immigrant Women Project Community Toolkit

Undocumented immigrant women who are victims of domestic violence face challenges beyond those of other women in the U.S. due to isolation in a foreign country, constant fear of deportation, and the belief that they are at the mercy of their spouse to gain legal status. The Southern Arizona Battered Immigrant Women Project (BIWP) seeks to identify and develop resources and provide outreach and training to organizations that interact with immigrant women who may be victims of domestic or sexual violence. The BIWP Community Toolkit provides guidelines for the development of a protocol for a coordinated community response (CCR) to immigrant women who are victims of partner violence and are eligible for assistance under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). The toolkit is designed to guide communities in a step-by-step process to: 1) Help familiarize community agencies with immigrant protections under VAWA; 2) Identify key sectors of the community, including but not limited to victim services, legal services, law enforcement, justice system, social services, faith-based organizations, and immigration law enforcement entities; 3) Detail the roles and responsibilities of individual agencies in facilitating identification and referral of services to immigrant victims of domestic violence; 4) Provide training and resources to support the coordinated community response.


Type of Product:   Website

Year Created: 2011
Date Published: 6/26/2012


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Dr. Dodi Meyer

Bridging the Communication Gap between Providers and Patients by Addressing Health Literacy in an Urban Immigrant Community

This product is a health literacy toolkit that focuses on medication management in order to reduce medication errors in an immigrant pediatric urban community. The toolkit consists of a curriculum aimed at empowering patients to understand medication management, and a volunteer handbook that guides volunteer-health-educators, CHWs (Community Health Workers) and medical providers in the use of this curriculum. The curriculum is aimed at caregivers of pediatric patients, ages 1-18 years old. It can be implemented in different venues such as waiting rooms of pediatric practices, head starts or during home visits.
The curriculum consists of seven bilingual educational units with the majority using pictorials with content written at a fifth grade reading level. The first component helps caregivers prepare for a doctor’s visit. The second one focuses on upper respiratory infections, which aims at distinguishing between the cold and flu, and how to treat and prevent such viruses. The third unit helps caregivers understand the proper use of antibiotics and how to avoid antibiotic resistance. The fourth unit informs patients how to apply the instructions found on prescribed medication labels. The fifth unit is centered on over-the-counter (OTC) medication, highlighting their appropriate usage for specific age ranges. The sixth unit focuses on medication management by teaching the various dosing forms, intervals, and measurements tools used to administer medication. The seventh unit covers home remedies, which encourages caregivers to disclose the use of home remedies in order to avoid known side effects and contraindications.
The volunteer handbook focuses on using effective conversational skills, while identifying signs of illiteracy among patients, and tactfully approaching patients regarding each topic addressed in the curriculum.


Type of Product:   PDF document

Year Created: 2007
Date Published: 3/12/2013


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Mary Lutz

Brooklyn Community District 14 Needs Assessment

This document is a report of community-based participatory research conducted with Brooklyn (NY) Community Board 14 in the Spring 2009. This working and middle-class urban area was designated the most ethnically diverse neighborhood in the nation by the US Bureau of the Census (2000). After the propossal received approval by the City College of New York Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, the Institutional Review Board and meetings with Community Board 14 staff and board members, the students from City College of NY Center for Worker Education, working with the Community Board, engaged in 522 interviews with residents, workers and adult students in randomly selected, representative census tracts. Differences among residents in how they identify their neighborhoods' social and health needs are revealed along ethnic, gender, religious and residential lines. Small focus groups were also held with teenagers living and going to school in the designated area.

The project report was written for the Brooklyn Community Board 14 and its constituents and may provide a single-semester service-learning model for conducting social needs assessments in a racially and economically diverse community.


Type of Product:   MS Word document

Year Created: 2009
Date Published: 8/25/2010


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Linda Highfield

Camp Boot: Community Engaged Research Training Curriculum for Lay Researchers

Camp Boot is designed to teach community residents the principles of community based participatory research. The purpose is to prepare community residents as lay researchers with the capacity to partner with academic and/or community-based researchers to co-design and co-implement health-related studies. The title, Camp Boot, is intentional. “Boot Camp” is usually based on a command and control, top down philosophy. Camp Boot intends to reverse that philosophy in its teaching approach, drawing on practices of Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA), Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA), Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) and similar approaches (1-3). Adapted from the Partners in Research: Community and Faculty Training Curricula to Prepare Partners for Community-based Participatory Research Collaborations (4), Camp Boot includes more quantitative information. Camp Boot was developed and piloted in collaboration with a group of 40 African American and Hispanic residents representing medically underserved areas in Houston and Galveston neighborhoods (approximately 50% from each area). Participants were recruited by the advisory board (see question 7). Participants were paid a stipend of $600 for completing the 5 day, 40 hour training. Though our focus for the pilot project was with underserved populations, the curriculum is appropriate for a general audience of community residents interested in learning more about the basics of research, including non-geographically based communities and who have a desire to partner with academic researchers on CBPR projects. While the pilot implementation focused on training community residents, the curriculum could also be used for training and preparing community based organizations to integrate a research component into their programming.


Type of Product:   Slide presentation

Year Created: 2011
Date Published: 8/30/2013


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Cynthia Pearson

CBPR Variable Matrix: Research for improved health in academic/community partnerships

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a collaborative approach that equitably involves partners in the research process and recognizes the unique strengths that each partner brings. CBPR begins with a research topic important to a community, combining knowledge construction, education, and action for social change towards improving community health. To advance community-engaged research, investigators from the Universities of New Mexico and Washington and the National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center, in collaboration with a National Advisory Board of academic and community experts,* created a variable matrix to support a conceptual logic model of CBPR processes and outcomes. Details on the creation of this model are found in Wallerstein et al. 2008 [1].1 The variable matrix provides measurements to support the four dimensions of CBPR characteristics and relationships within each domain of the interactive CBPR model. First, contextual factors shape the nature of the research and the conditions under which partnerships can develop and be sustained. Next, group dynamics, consisting of three sub-dimensions, structural factors (i.e., collaborative agreements), individual partner characteristics, and relational dynamics (i.e., group decision-making); interact with contextual factors to co-produce the intervention and its research design. Finally, CBPR system changes and health outcomes result directly from the research. In sum, we provide items and scales from over 46 instruments representing 60% of the 40 domains in the CBPR logic model.


Type of Product:   Website

Year Created: 2010
Date Published: 12/19/2011


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Howard Taras

Clinical Research: Seniors Making a Difference

Compared to most other age groups, older adults are more affected by most illnesses. Yet, they are less likely to participate in clinical research to address those health conditions. Many senior adults do not adequately understand the research process and have questions about what is involved. This video was created to provide information from seniors with first-hand experiences in clinical research studies. Research volunteers share their reasons for choosing to participate in research studies. Medical researchers also talk about translational health research and how it works. People over 55 years of age or who are retired have many reasons for joining research studies. Some get involved to stay socially active and connected, others because they want to learn something new, and some because they want to potentially help their families and future generations. This video is intended to encourage older adults to get involved with research and make informed decisions about their own health.

The intended audience of this video is people who are over 55 years of age and have questions about research participation.


Type of Product:   Video

Year Created: 2012
Date Published: 7/31/2013


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Lorece Edwards

Community Approaches to Mobilizing Partnerships and Service-Learning

The Practice Experience/Service Learning Guide is a tool that is used to assist students, faculty, and community health partners implement service-learning projects and public health community-based practice. The Practice Experience/Service Learning Guide provides a step-by-step process for community-based practice integrating service-learning from start to finish. The role of the students, faculty, and community partners are clear and concise, as well as practice experience policies and procedures. Service-learning is clearly defined and includes examples best practices in service-learning and public health projects. Included is a list potential venues for public health practice, service-learning projects, and community engagement. There are guidelines that describe the format for the students’ action plan and service and learning objectives. The guide also includes the principles of community engagement which can be used by a range of health professionals. Frequently asked questions relative to practice experience and service-learning are included as well as the most important things to remember. Of importance, is a section for reflection. Reflection is the known to be the hyphen between service and learning and provides an opportunity for personal and professional growth. It is important to note that service-learning is the key format in the majority (95%) of our community-based practice experiences. However, we realize that some of our students will complete a practice experience that will not include service-learning.


Type of Product:   PDF document

Year Created: 2008
Date Published: 10/23/2009


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Fay Fletcher, PhD

Community Based Participatory Research with Indigenous People

Role models and leaders in Indigenous health research in Canada and the United States share their stories of work with First Nations and American Indian colleagues in community based research. Acknowledging the impact of history and resiliency while capturing the passion of emerging leaders in Indigenous health research, the videos provide a starting point for discussion on the roles and responsibilities of community and university partners in collaborative and community-based research. “The Partnership” video explores how Aboriginal communities are working with health researchers for the community’s benefit. Told through the eyes of Tlicho community-based researchers, “The Partnership” demonstrates that no matter what the issue, solutions always lie within the community. From the rural campus of the Northwest Indian College in Bellingham, Washington to the hustle of the University of Washington in Seattle, “Bridging Worlds” takes a look at the varying roles of American Indian post-secondary students. Reflecting on their own life journeys, three students discuss how their desire to participate in making decisions that affect their communities has inspired them to engage in community-based research. Dr. Rose James discusses the potential change generated by CBPR in the interface between community partners and leaders and members of post secondary institutions.


Type of Product:   Video

Year Created: 2008
Date Published: 8/17/2009


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Bowen Chung

Community Partners in Care (CPIC): Video Summary of Rationale, Study Approach / Implementation, and Client 6-month Outcomes

“Community Partners in Care (CPIC): Video Summary of Rationale, Study Approach / Implementation, and Client 6-month Outcomes” is a 2 minute, 46 second video summarizing the study rationale, study approach, and the 6-month outcomes. The video was produced by four agencies: Healthy African American Families II, a health advocacy organization in South Los Angeles; Behavioral Health Services, the largest substance/alcohol abuse service provider in LA County; UCLA; and RAND Health; contract filmmakers Eileen Cabiling and Joe Mango handled cinematography, editing, and video support. The individuals appearing in the video are key CPIC community and academic partners. The celebratory tone of the video is consistent with a Community Partnered Participatory Research approach, a local variant of participatory action research, where study findings are celebrated by the partners, and dissemination efforts include approaches intended for general audiences, especially from low-income, low-literacy, minority communities, in addition to traditional academic products like peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts. The CPIC video offers a community perspective on the study results to our partners, the general public, other scientists and policy makers. We designed the video to teach community and healthcare partners how to adapt and implement the CPIC depression care model and to offer other community –academic partnerships an example of a non-traditional product developed for dissemination from an NIH-funded research study.


Type of Product:   Video

Year Created: 2013
Date Published: 2/25/2014


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Michelle Garner

Community Volunteering: A few things for you to know

In 2010, 26% of the adult population performed volunteer work worth $284 billion dollars(1). Adequate support of these volunteers, including education, is key to the quality and longevity of their service. Yet, there is a lack of materials intended to sensitize volunteers to recognizing and dealing with common issues of volunteer service. Further, there are explicit contemporary policies concerning religion in services that are funded, fully or in part, by the government (2); many programs and volunteers are unaware of these policies and how to comply with them. Thus, the submitted volunteer guidelines product, which was prepared to address the needs of a specific homeless shelter, seeks to help fill these voids in volunteer training.

“Community Volunteering: A Few Things For You to Know” is a three-part, six-page, 3,000 word document. The “Introduction” section contextualizes the product and provides freely-available references; it is intended for program leadership and volunteers interested in learning more. The “Volunteer Handout” section offers thumbnail discussions of important volunteerism topics, and the “Key Points List” is a one-page summary of behavioral guidelines. Our work is intended and appropriate for a general audience. The document, or portions thereof, could be used in volunteer orientation, continuing education trainings, or reference materials, and may be adapted or elaborated upon to suit a specific program’s needs.


Type of Product:   PDF document

Year Created: 2011
Date Published: 8/17/2012


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Julie Gleason-Comstock

Community-Based Participatory Research with Intravenous Drug Users on Overdose Reversal

A community based participatory research (CBPR) collaborative was formed to adapt an opiate overdose reversal training and distribution program model to the local community. The program can prevent unnecessary death by allowing trained injecting drug users to administer naloxone immediately, increasing chances of successful revival. The CBPR was built on an existing CBPR relationship on HIV testing technology and risk reduction (1). CBPR partners were Community Health Awareness Group, Inc. (CHAG) a community-based organization with a mobile harm reduction/syringe exchange program, the City of Detroit Department of Health & Wellness Promotion (DHWP), and public health researchers from Wayne State University (WSU). Evaluation provided an important feedback loop for program development, improvement and determining impact in reducing deaths and changes in substance use. Results of pre-implementation focus groups with injecting drug users (IDU) provided input into subsequent training and recruitment procedures and evaluation protocols and tools. Products developed included the Naloxone and Substance Use History, Naloxone Focus Group Questions, CHAG Overdose Reversal Program (Naloxone Project) Pre- and Post-Training Survey and a Follow-Up Interview/Survey.


Type of Product:   PDF document

Year Created: 2009
Date Published: 8/30/2010


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Barbara A. Israel

Community-Based Participatory Research: A Partnership Approach for Public Health

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a partnership approach to research that equitably involves community members, organization representatives, and academic researchers in all aspects of the research process. CBPR aims to increase knowledge and understanding of what is being studied and to integrate the knowledge gained with interventions and policy changes to enhance the health and quality of life of community members.
This course is intended as an introduction to CBPR for people who are in the early stages of using or considering using CBPR. It is designed for academic researchers from multiple fields, including public health, education, nursing, medicine, social work, urban planning, and for health and human service practitioners, and members of community-based organizations. The training is divided into five sequential parts:
• Rationale for, definition and core principles of CBPR
• Strategies for forming, maintaining, sustaining, and evaluating CBPR partnerships
• Qualitative and quantitative data collection methods and interpretation
• Dissemination and translation of research findings
• Benefits, challenges, and recommendations for using CBPR for research and social change
Insights from the literature and the experiences of the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center and its affiliated partnerships and projects are provided throughout. Users have the opportunity to engage individually or as a partnership group in interactive case study activities.


Type of Product:   CD-ROM

Year Created: 2009
Date Published: 1/17/2014


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